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Artifacts Contest Share your unique mainframe artifacts
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VDennis - 7/17/2014 2:42:29 PM
   
Most Unique Artifact
Tell us about your most unique mainframe keepsake, including what it means to you, why you have held on to it or the story behind it, along with a picture (which can be uploaded via the insert image link next to the paper clip below the subject line, or by emailing the photo to destinationz@destinationz.org), for a chance to win a $50 prepaid Visa card.

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Raisch - 7/25/2014 9:07:36 AM
   
RE:Most Unique Artifact
I created a blog to celebrate the mainframe 50th anniversary.

The blog is located at http://www.ibmmainframe50anos.blogspot.com.br/Mainframe 50 anniversary blog .

This blog has technical and historical information, along interviews with consultants and a special one with Fred Brooks, who was the chief architect and project manager for the S/360 project.


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Marc - 7/25/2014 3:04:50 PM
   
RE:Most Unique Artifact
Sorry, no Attach files box above OK, only "Subscribe to Post: "... Sorry, but I'm confused and assume others will be too! Tried with both firefox and IE...

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VDennis - 7/29/2014 1:32:25 PM
   
RE:Most Unique Artifact
Marc: Thank you for your submission. We would love to see them. Please send the photo(s) by email to destinationz@destinationz.org. Thank you, Valerie Dennis

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Julio - 9/15/2014 11:55:56 AM
   
RE:Most Unique Artifact
I own an old cylindrical printing matrix, used to print punch cards to be used in the "Employee Payroll and Billing" in the 40s. It was given to me by my wife’s uncle of who worked at IBM Brazil, and was at that time in an assignment in IBM Endicott.
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Marc - 7/28/2014 8:28:30 PM
   
RE:Most Unique Artifact
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In 1986-87 I was a planner in the IBM VM/HPO Project Office team in Kingston NY, where we created the development/test plans for VM/HPO releases. One of my assignments was to plan and track the development of an SPE (Special Program Enhancement) for the support of the new 3380-K (Gobi) Direct Access Storage Device (DASD). Upon delivery of the SPE and release of the new 3380 devices, GPD (General Products Division) recognized participants with a 3380 disc platter. This memorabilia was somewhat unique as it also chronicled the evolution of DASD Storage from 1956 till the release of the 3380-K in 1987.

This disc is special to me for two reasons, the first being I worked on the project and it reminds me of our success there, and second, I use the platter when I do guest lectures and career days around the mainframe to high school and college students to illustrate how far along technology has come from when I was born in 1956 till today. Of course I extend the conversation to complete the story from that 3380 device in 1987 to today’s terabyte drives and USB flash drives!

So that’s my story on a “platter”, I hope you enjoyed it!
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VDennis - 7/31/2014 9:28:06 AM
   
RE:Most Unique Artifact
Keith submitted this:

I followed my father into data processing. Recently, after he died, I found a tie clip. My sisters and mom said that they had no idea what this was... My first assumption was a token tie clip given to customer who purchased an IBM 360/40. Just a guess, but pretty cool if it is.

I suspect he received this from IBM in the late 1960's. I have talked with several long time IBMers and none have ever seen anything like it.
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scottchapman - 8/1/2014 9:52:35 AM
   
RE:Most Unique Artifact
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If the above image doesn't work: Link to picture

This is my wooden mainframe "book". It's a full-scale replica of the board that contains the MCM and memory. In front of it are "cycles"--the length of the pieces of wood represent the distance that light can travel in a vacuum in one clock cycle of a z9, z10, z196, and zEC12.

I built this for a presentation I was giving about the SMF113 (CPU Measurement Facility) data and why we care so much about processor cache effectiveness. The idea being that you see how far away the memory is from the processor and realize that A) electrical signal propagation is much slower than the speed of light, B) the wiring doesn't follow a straight line, and C) you need to get there and back again, you begin to get an appreciation for how relatively far away memory is from the processor core. And as for paging--how far away is that DASD subsystem? Again, thinking in terms of processor cycles, it's easy to see how FlashExpress, installed really close to the book, is going to be better for paging than even page datasets on SSDs on the other side of the room.

The sizing is as accurate as I could make it based on published measurements the MCM and chip sizes are publicized, and I think I found a measurement for the memory card width as well. I took those measurements and carefully examined published photos of the book interior to get the size and placement of components. It's as accurate as I could make it based on those limitations and the accuracy of my woodworking. I believe that for the components that I have actual measurements for, my representations are within a couple of mm.

If you see me at Share and want a zEC12 cycle--I might have a few in my pocket. :)

Scott Chapman
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VDennis - 8/8/2014 11:58:47 AM
   
RE:Most Unique Artifact
John says the image is of a Flowcharting Template GX20-8020-1.
I used this on my first job after college.
Drawing flowcharts was a pain!
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VDennis - 8/8/2014 12:06:08 PM
   
RE:Most Unique Artifact
John says Hierarchy plus Input-Process-Output (HIPO) charting was part of an IBM Top-Down Programming Design Process introduced around 1974.
I was the Guinea-Pig for trying this methodology at Kaiser Steel Corp in Fontana, California.
We actually adopted some parts of it, mostly related to the Top-Down Design, Development and Testing methodology.
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