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VDennis - 8/11/2014 10:36:27 AM
   
RE:Most Unique Artifact
Jim submits:
I sent in a picture of one of the Thermal Conduction Modules (TCMs) I've saved from our 3090-150e that was decommissioned more than a decade ago. Besides being a truly sturdy paperweight now, faculty at our university and I have used this in lecturing about the development of large systems technologies; especially the transition from bipolar to CMOS semiconductors. Students are always amazed to learn that these parts could carry costs in the 6-figure range when they were in active use. Good fun!
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VDennis - 8/11/2014 10:50:52 AM
   
RE:Most Unique Artifact
John says:

This is a scan of an IBM 3330 Disk Drive Read/Write Head.
It suffered a head crash.

It was a bad day!
I was a new System Programmer (mid-1970s) and the operators came and asked what to do when the console gave them a message along the lines of:
I/O Error on unit NNNN reading volume xxxxxx, swap to NNNN?

Of course I said "Sure go ahead and swap it."

If you have ever seen this happen, you know that every time you move a damaged Disk Pack, you will damage the drive's Read/Write Heads and also whatever Disk is put into the Drive you moved it from will also be damaged (suffer a head crash).

So in a brief few minutes we damaged several 3330 Disk Packs and several sets of Read/Write Heads.

It kept the CE's busy for some hours repairing Disk Drives, and me busy for several hours restoring data from backups onto replacement Disk Drives.

This is a souvenir from that day.
I kept it to make a Tie-Tac from but never quite got around to it.

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VDennis - 8/11/2014 11:04:13 AM
   
RE:Most Unique Artifact
Stan submits this punch card registration verifier:
The front and back image of a Mosler punch card registration verifier. Used primarily in large banks that processed punched cards. Circa 1970.
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sysprog210 - 8/20/2014 1:27:09 PM
   
RE:Most Unique Artifact
I was employed at IBM (Austin & later Raleigh), as a storage manager. In the mid to late 80's, we decommissioned both our IBM 3850 Mass Storage Systems. I "rescued" a pair of F.E. cartridges and a machine name placard from certain scrap. My first ever"on call" [pager] call in the middle of the night was for an error condition in one of our MSS's! I drove in, went to the computer room, where the F.E. met me and showed me "sense" info that didn't make any to me at the time, so I had to call some else to help. Those were the good ole days!
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Bill - 8/21/2014 9:36:56 AM
   
RE:Most Unique Artifact
sysprog210 wrote: I was employed at IBM (Austin & later Raleigh), as a storage manager. In the mid to late 80's, we decommissioned both our IBM 3850 Mass Storage Systems. I "rescued" a pair of F.E. cartridges and a machine name placard from certain scrap. My first ever"on call" [pager] call in the middle of the night was for an error condition in one of our MSS's! I drove in, went to the computer room, where the F.E. met me and showed me "sense" info that didn't make any to me at the time, so I had to call some else to help. Those were the good ole days!


Wow, thanks. I worked on CPCS in the late 70's and we utilized the 3850 Honeycomb MSS. I kept a couple of cartridges on my desk until I switched jobs; wish I'd moved them with me...

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VDennis - 8/21/2014 1:50:59 PM
   
RE:Most Unique Artifact
Keith says:

The System/370 Reference Summary was a required purchase for my first class in post-secondary schooling, back in 1977, the card itself is from 1974. It's been with me ever since, a little nostalgia never hurt anyone. It's fun to think of the days spent deciphering dumps, but I sure am glad I don't have to do that anymore.

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VDennis - 9/10/2014 10:29:23 AM
   
RE:Most Unique Artifact
Bob says:

It is an IBM 3350 Disk Drive I got in 1979, holding many memories about concerns I no longer think about. I was just starting as an MVS systems programmer and had to make sure the most used datasets were at head of string and closet to the VTOC, remove old datasets to make sure production would run at night, change the password on critical datasets since we had yet to install RACF, make sure everything was backed up since head crashes were fairly common and a host of other DASD related issues which are no longer issues.
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VDennis - 9/17/2014 9:59:32 AM
   
RE:Most Unique Artifact
Ken says:

My favorite artifact is the R/W head assembly and matching platter from a 3340 disk drive. They were affectionately known as the Star Trek modules due to the shape. When I started in 1977, we had a 7010 (only tape I/O), a 1401 (card/punch/print support for the 7010) and a 370-145 with a 256 KB add-on module (the size of a small fridge). Our 370 ran using 4 spindles of 3344 and about 8 3340 drives. We had fun with one drive, as the lid did not lock and we could take out the module before it stopped spinning. It was an experience to try standing with a spinning drive module due to the high torque involved. In the mid-80s we finally decommissioned some of the broken 3340 modules. Finance fought it as they were still worth more than $1,500 on the books. The drives were still in use into the 90’s as we could not kill one application or run it on the 43xx/3090. We ripped one apart after the I was able to snag the head assembly and a platter.

I often show these to the younger staff when they complain that there 2 TB PC is short of space. We ran an entire VM/SP using only three of the 3340 modules. I still have my original flowchart template, numerous reference 360/370 reference cards, and a 3850 MSS tape but the 3340 head is my favorite.

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John Schafer - 9/18/2014 11:10:28 AM
   
RE:Most Unique Artifact
This artifact is an IBM 3021 Data Cell circa 1964. The data cell was a removable Direct Storage Access Device (DASD) that contained 20 strips of magnetic tape for the recording media. Up to 10 Data Cells could be mounted in an IBM 2321 Data Cell unit. Each data cell could hold 40MB of data, or 400MB total. The Data Cell Device held 55 times more data, while being only 7 times slower in comparison to the contemporary IBM 2311 DASD device. The Data Cell was known as the “noodle picker” or “noodle snatcher” since the removable magnetic strips were flexible and resembled lasagna noodles. I retained this artifact because it was an important hybrid solution that provided high density direct access storage on lower cost magnetic media.
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scottchapman - 9/18/2014 7:59:13 PM
   
RE:Most Unique Artifact
Cool--I'd heard of the 3850 honeycomb mass storage device, but I'd never heard of the 2321. Thanks for posting!

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