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VDennis - 9/2/2014 10:29:11 AM
   
RE:Oldest Artifact
Tomoko Osanai submits this:

This MVS Bible was published in 1986 which might be the first MVS specialized book written in Japanese language.
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VDennis - 9/4/2014 12:20:20 PM
   
RE:Oldest Artifact
Jack says:

This was my first job in data processing, around 1977(computer operator), had to be very careful with the ties, way too many moving parts to have folks wearing ties. Always had rubber bands on your wrist for the cards, and notice the ashtray right behind me.
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HuskieCoder - 9/10/2014 12:14:25 PM
   
RE:Oldest Artifact
My grandfather used to work with the IBM 1401, because his company ordered a 360, but there was too much demand, and he gave me his IBM student handbooks for the System 360, and while we were talking about the past, which we do a lot, he showed me and told me about a book for a machine called the collator 077 that you would feed cards into these two hoppers and each hopper would sort the cards into primaries and secondaries. The book was printed in like 1946, I think. Here is the link for the picture: http://ed-thelen.org/comp-hist/ibm-077-collator.html

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zarf77777@blueyonder.co.uk - 9/11/2014 4:40:14 PM
   
RE:Oldest Artifact
[img]e:\netsave\lloyds.jpg[/img]

The Lloyds punch card
---------------------

Lloyds of London as many people know started life in the early 17th
century as an Insurance company in the UK.

Lloyds started using 'unit record' equipment (5-ton tabulators) very
early in the life of commercial computing.

The date on the punch card (January 1958) is the last design date.
Also of historical interest is the manufacturer bottom left,
now that is history !

Each card represented an insurance premium or claim and were heavily
printed on both sides with the insurance details. Anything from a small
premium for a car up to several million pounds for an oil tanker.

There were four types each with a colour coded top, sorry I don't
remember the colours now...Sterling, US$, Canadian$, Other currencies.

I started using these in 1964 and I'm not sure when they were phased
out...when disk drives got practicable I guess.

My job was to convert the old tabulator processing to a shiny new
IBM 360/20. Each Lloyds Underwriter wanted a different format for his
portfolio which kept me busy.

I have one memory of those days, an Underwriter wanted a change done
within a week, I did it in a day. He invited me onto the trading floor
during trading hours to thank me personally (it's locked down during
trading). I was 18 years old.

I have several of these and would be willing to give one to anyone
with a good reason for wanting it.

Melvyn Maltz.

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VDennis - 9/15/2014 8:55:47 AM
   
RE:Oldest Artifact
Steve says:
My oldest computer artifact is the Accumulator 1 Overflow light/latch from an IBM 7074.

In August of 1965, after leaving university I joined Rolls Royce Derby's computer department and learned to program the 7074 using Autocode 74. I knew so little about computers at the time that I didn't even realize that the System 360 range had been announced the year before! I'd just got to grips with programming and operating the machine, even the CE console, when it was replaced by a 360 model 50 sometime in the late 1960s.

When the machine was decommissioned all I could grab as a souvenir was this light/latch which is merely 1 inch wide, 3/4 inch tall and 7/8 inch deep. It isn't much, but it brings back many memories for me.
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John Schafer - 9/18/2014 11:27:54 AM
   
RE:Oldest Artifact
This is an IBM Operators Guide to understanding and operating card based IBM Electric Accounting Machines. Copyright 1951, 1955. This manual details how to operate IBM Card Punches, Sorters, Interpreters and Collators. I kept this artifact because these were the first systems I worked with when taking my first data processing course in high school in spite of the fact that this hardware was long already obsolete in the business world it, was what the school could afford in order to teach basic data processing principles.
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