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Artifacts Contest Share your unique mainframe artifacts
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VDennis - 7/17/2014 2:41:48 PM
   
Oldest Artifact
Tell us about your oldest mainframe keepsake, including the age of the artifact, what it means to you, why you have held on to it or the story behind it, along with a picture (which can be uploaded via the insert image button next to the paper clip below the subject line, or by emailing the photo to destinationz@destinationz.org), for a chance to win a $50 prepaid Visa card.

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Tom - 7/28/2014 7:21:53 PM
   
RE:Oldest Artifact
I have copies of IBM manuals whose even earlier versions meant a lot to me when I was first employed as a junior system programmer and learned IBM Assembler language in 1967-8. The microfiche distributed by IBM with DOS updates and my mentor were my tutors for Assembler language after I completed the self-study course in Assembler language. I have fairly clean copies of the following manuals, and I may have some blank Assembler coding forms:
DOS and TOS Assembler Language - Release 26 - 1972;
IBM System/360 Principles of Operations - GA22-6821-8 - dated 1970
DOS DASD Labels - DOS Release 26 - GC24-5672-2 - dated 1972
DOS Supervisor and I/O Macros - GC24-5037-12 - DOS Release 26.2 - dated 1973
DOS System Control and Service - DOS Release 26.2 - GC24-5036-8 - dated 1974

I wrote my first Assembler programs in 1968 and did my first SYSGENs with DOS releases 12, 13, & 14 if I remember correctly. I was a member of the team that developed and delivered the STK 4400 ACS robotic tape library in 1988-89. IBM Assembler language was essentially my only mainframe programming language for 30 years, 1968-1998.

I moved into project management in 2001.

Since the beginning of my career, I was always the person who maintained a library of IBM manuals wherever I served as a senior system programmer. I manually inserted the update pages in all the manuals and made the library available to the local programming staff.

The manuals I have listed here are not from my original collection, but I rescued these when another old-timer retired several years ago. They would have been discarded if I had not rescued them. I don't ever expect to use them again, but I have kept them for their keepsake value to me.

I have made my living since 1967 primarily dependent on knowledge of IBM mainframes and operating systems software, and I am still making my living that way, albeit as a project manager of teams that upgrade the software systems on IBM mainframes.

Note re: Uploading images - There is no 'attach files' box above the 'OK' button. I'll be glad to upload pictures of the manuals if someone provides a means of uploading them or tells me how to code a URL to upload a .jpg file.

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VDennis - 7/29/2014 1:30:30 PM
   
RE:Oldest Artifact
Tom: Thank you for your submission. We would love to see them. Please send the photo(s) by email to destinationz@destinationz.org.
Valerie Dennis

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John - 8/7/2014 11:53:50 AM
   
RE:Oldest Artifact
People say that you always remember your first. Well, my mainframe thrill ride started with a 360/20 and the well worn reference card (GX20-1727) was given to me by an 'old timer' who was about to retire back in '76. I don't really know how long he had it, but after the long hours I spent with this card (what a learning curve!), it just seemed like something to hold on to.

I guess this makes me just a bit too young to be an "old timer" but way too old to join z/nextgen.
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VDennis - 8/11/2014 10:30:34 AM
   
RE:Oldest Artifact
Girish submits his set of System 360 Assembler Programmed Instruction Manuals from the 60's (possibly unique now as IBM stopped this style of manuals around the late 70's). He had used them in his first job training in the early 70's and still use them as he has not yet found any manuals that meet this standard of simplicity and quality.
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VDennis - 8/11/2014 11:08:07 AM
   
RE:Oldest Artifact
Stan submitted a photo showing core memory planes:

This is part of our collection of core memory planes. We have approximately 30 different types used in IBM equipment. This photo shows memory from S/360 processors and control units circa 1964-1969
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VDennis - 8/11/2014 11:11:03 AM
   
RE:Oldest Artifact
Stan says:

These are a few of our complete collection of S/360 and S/370 Field Handbooks and OS logic and source microfiche. (circa 1965 – 1974)
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VDennis - 8/11/2014 11:13:56 AM
   
RE:Oldest Artifact
Stan shares this piece in his office building:

Our 370/148 front panel that we display in the entry hall to the engineering offices. (circa 1974)

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Paul Newton - 8/21/2014 3:25:59 PM
   
RE:Oldest Artifact
System 360 Operating System Workshop Education Guide (1967)

Page 48 - Operating System/360 Chart. The real wall chart is hanging in a Dallas mainframe data center - gift from Barry Merrill - Thanks Barry.

IBM System/360 Principles of Operation (I think it is the original)

Will send 2 manuals (PDFs) and 1 picture of real wall chart from the original System 360 Operating System Workshop
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adelgado - 8/29/2014 3:28:01 PM
   
RE:Oldest Artifact
I bought this book a few years ago at a used book fair in Lisbon - Portugal. It's "Planning a Computer System", edited by Werner Buchholz and published by McGraw-Hill in 1962. Please check and see if you don't recognize the names of, at least, some of the contributors.
As you can verify, the book addresses the "Project Stretch" that developed the IBM 7030 system. I've never had contact with this system, but this item seemed very interesting to me, because of it's age and contributors. I maintain an interest with computer "archeology".
I've been working with the AS/400 platform, since it's beginning, with some contacts with mainframe systems.
Note: I'll send the images in a PDF file via email to destinationz@destinationz.org

Abilio Delgado
Lisbon, Portugal

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